NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation (Social Science), contains solutions to various questions in Exercise for Chapter 7. At the end of the Solutions, all the keywords and Notes which are important to understand From Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation Class 8 History, have been explained in a simple and easy to understand manner. We are providing NCERT Solutions for Class 8 all subjects which can be accessed by clicking here.

Download NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation– Solutions to Question 1 to Question 3

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation image 1




NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation– Solutions to Question 3 to Question 5

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation image 2

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation– Solutions to Question 6 to Question 8

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation image 3




NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation Exercises includes –Match the following, True/False and Question/Answers which helps you to understand the topic covered in Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation Class 8 History (Social Science), in a better manner to help you to score good marks in your examinations.

NCERT Solutions for Class 8 History Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation– NCERT Exercises

Question 1:-

Match the following:

question 1

Answer 1:-

answer 1

Question 2:-

State whether true or false:

(a) James Mill was a severe critic of the Orientalists.

(b) The 1854 Despatch on education was in favour of English being introduced as a medium of higher education in India.

(c) Mahatma Gandhi thought that promotion ofliteracy was the most important aim of education.

(d) Rabindranath Tagore felt that children ought to be subjected to strict dicipline.

Answer 2:-

(a)True

(b)True

(c)False

(d)False

Question 3:-

Why did William Jones feel the need to study Indian history, philosophy and law?

Answer 3:-

  • William Jones was a linguist who respected both Indian and western cultures.
  • However, Jones had the opinion that the magnificence about which the Indian civilization bragged of in the past had gradually deteriorated in the later periods.
  • Jones hence felt the need to study Indian history, philosophy and law as he felt the texts contained in them could depict the actual ideas and laws of Muslim communities. These texts could lay the foundation for future development to take place in the country.




Question 4:-

Why did James Mill and Thomas Macaulay think that European education was essential in India?

Answer 4:-

  • James Mill and Thomas Macaulay thought that education in the East was impractical, unscientific, and erroneous and hence lacked usefulness.
  • They hence believed that introduction of European education was essential in India. They stressed on the importance and benefits for Indianstogain knowledge about the scientific advancements of the west in order to widen their horizons. They also placed due emphasis over the teaching of English language as a subject in the country.
  • Reading in English would render Indians capable of reading fine literatures of the world and help in civilizing them by bringing about changes in their values and lifestyles after which they would develop a taste like the West which would be considered as superior.

Question 5:-

Why did Mahatma Gandhi want to teach children handicrafts?

Answer 5:-

  • Mahatma Gandhi termed literary education to be the means and not an end in itself. Education involved a greater role in bringing out the best of a person’s physical, mental and spiritual being.
  • Gandhiji hence wanted the children to be taught and trained to do handicrafts which would enhance their practical knowledge and also help them in times of needs. If a child was trained, then he or she could utilise this training to earn a living in times of need. Also this would enhance their creativity and make them self-dependent helping to become responsible individuals.

Question 6:-

Why did Mahatma Gandhi think that English education had enslaved Indians?

Answer 6:-

  • Mahatma Gandhi was of the thought that English education had incarcerated the Indian people as he believed that colonial education createda feeling of inferiority and subservience in the Indian minds.The Indian people started comparing themselves with the Englishmen and ended up considering themselves subordinates to them .
  • Education in English meant imposition of superiority of the western civilization. This destroyed the pride which the Indians could boast of in their very own culture.
  • Gandhiji also believed that English education was rather sinful in nature and that it enslaved the Indians by casting a sort of evil spell on them.
  • Gandhiji also thought that those who were recipient of education from English institutions developed a taste and charm for the west which made them to admire British rule instead of questioning it. This rendered them to be distant in their own lands with room for little self-respect.

Question 7:-

Find out from your grandparents about what they studied in school.

Answer 7:-

Creative answer can be modified by students accordingly.

My grandparents studied science, social science, maths and two languages including hindi and their local language during their school days. Other than these, they use to focus on extra-curriculum such as weaving, pottery and painting.

Question 8:-

Find out about the history of your school or any other school in the area you live.

Answer 8:-

Creative answer can be modified by students accordingly

My school, Carmel convent school, Delhi was founded on July 16, 1957 by six sister nuns who were the pioneers of establishment. The school completed its 50 years of establishment in the year 2006 celebrating its golden jubilee. The school took an international character in due course of time. The school is an English-medium one since its inception, however also teaches the Hindi language.




Topics Covered in Chapter 7 – Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation Class 8 History (Social Science)

  • How the British saw Education
  • The tradition of Orientalism
  • “Grave errors of the East”
  • Education for commerce
  • What Happened to the Local Schools?
  • The report of William Adam
  • New routines, new rules
  • The Agenda for a National Education
  • “English education has enslaved us”
  • Education as a civilising mission

Keywords Relevant to the Chapter Civilising the “Native”, Educating the Nation

Linguist: A literate man with knowledge of and ability to speak various languages.

Madrasa: An educational institution is termed as Madrasa in Arabic language.

Orientalists: People who have studied and gained scholarly expertise in being educated of the culture and languages of Asian continent.

Munshi: A literate man who is capable of reading, writing and teaching the Persian language.

Vernacular: A local language used in an area or region which is different from the national language of the country.

Share on whatsapp
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Leave a Comment